Pop-up headlights were a distinctive feature of many cars in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. However, by the early 2000s, this iconic feature was slowly disappearing from new car designs. The 2004 Chevy Corvette was the last car to feature pop-up headlights for several reasons.

One of the main reasons for the decline of pop-up headlights was changing safety regulations. In 2004, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) mandated that all new cars must have headlights that meet certain safety standards. These standards included a requirement that headlights must be tall enough to light up the road ahead, but not so tall that they cause excessive glare for oncoming traffic. Pop-up headlights, with their moving parts and complex mechanisms, were difficult to design to meet these safety requirements.

Another reason for the demise of pop-up headlights was the trend toward more aerodynamic car designs. As car manufacturers focused on reducing drag and improving fuel efficiency, pop-up headlights were seen as an impediment to achieving those goals. Fixed headlights that were integrated into the car's design were deemed more aerodynamic and more aesthetically pleasing than pop-up headlights.

Finally, the introduction of newer lighting technologies, such as LED and xenon headlights, made pop-up headlights seem outdated. These new technologies allowed for brighter and more energy-efficient lighting, and could be integrated into the car's design without the need for pop-up mechanisms.

In conclusion, the 2004 Chevy Corvette was the last car to feature pop-up headlights because of changing safety regulations, the trend toward more aerodynamic car designs, and the introduction of newer lighting technologies. While pop-up headlights may be missed by some car enthusiasts, car manufacturers have moved on to new design and safety features that better meet the needs of today's drivers.